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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. while there is no immediate claim of responsibility, the u.s. officials say a handful of networks including an indian terrorist group may be behind the bombing. a senator with an intelligence background says the indian mujahadeen who want them to dominate the indian way of life is suspect. but they say the group is poorly organize and possibly had outside help, possibly from pakistani intelligence. >> with a dramatic attack like this, coordinated over three locations, it took money and it took planning. that always raises the speckor of the isi in pakistan. >> the three explosions at the mumbai opera house, jewelry district and major commuter hub drew comparisons to the mumbai attack in 2008. the ram pain that lasted for 60 hours killing 166 people was low-tech. it relied on ten pakistani militants armed with cell phone, handguns and back packs filled with explosives. the group l.e.t. linked to pakistani intelligence was blamed. >> the obvious question: is pakistan involved? i cannot think of any conceivable reason why pakistan would want to provoke a crisis
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
, to look beyond just india, pakistan, afghanistan. and i think, you know, it's the right way to approach it. it wasn't too explicit, but it was a way of nudging them, saying, come on, guys, you've got to keep an eye on what's going on in asia right now. >> let's explore deeper. let's stay on the china part. you note she has to be careful, but she was also pretty obvious. she was talking about india's democracy and growing economy, and india can, quote, inspire others to follow a similar path of openness and tolerance. it's not hard to guess what she's talking about openness and tolerance, who is she talking about there? >> look, i think that this is a grand tradition of american diplomacy which is when we want to have a strategic relationship with china, we want to have a cooperative relationship with china but we do have our preferences and we've always said, every president, democrat and republican, for 30, 40 years, that, you know, when compared with dictatorships and closed systems, we prefer democracies and open systems. and so we're trying to make that association and make it plain. y
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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